Learn All 206 Bones in The Body

In this article, we will “learn all 206 bones in the body”. There are 206 bones in the human body. They are divided into two types: axial and appendicular. The axial skeleton is made up of the bones in the head, neck, and trunk. The appendicular skeleton is made up of the bones in the arms and legs. I hope after reading Learn all 206 bones in the body article will clear all of your doubts and you will be able to teach someone.

Table of Contents

What is the Mission of the article “Learn all 206 bones in the body”?

Our mission is that the student who want to learn about 206 bones, to make assignments or to learn about skeleton can get all information about bones in this article Learn all 206 bones in the body.

 Firstly, we will learn about Axial Skeleton:

Learn All 206 Bones in the Body
Learn All 206 Bones in the Body

Axial Skeleton:

The axial skeleton is the central axis of the body. It contains the bones of the head, neck, and trunk. The axial skeleton provides support and protection for these organs. There are 80 bones in Axial Skeleton which are divided into two structures i.e. Skull and Torso. Skull has 28 bones in which 6 bones lie separately and remaining 22 bones lie as a pair i.e. pair of 11 bones. Torso has 52 bones in which 28 bones lie separately and remaining 24 bones lie as a pair i.e. pair of 12 bones. The names of them are discussed as follows:-

Skull Bones (28): 

Paired Bones (11 x 2 = 22):

  1. Nasal
  2. Lacrimal
  3. Inferior
  4. Nasal Concha Maxillary
  5. Zygomatic
  6. Temporal
  7. Palatine
  8. Parietal
  9. Malleus
  10. Incus
  11. Stapes

One only Bone:

  1. Frontal
  2. Ethmoid
  3. Vomer
  4. Sphenoid
  5. Mandible
  6. Occipital

Torso Bones Name (52).

Paired Bones (12 x 2 = 24):

  1. Rib 1
  2. Rib 2
  3. Rib 3
  4. Rib 4
  5. Rib 5
  6. Rib 6
  7. Rib 7
  8. Rib 8 (False)
  9. Rib 9 (False)
  10. Rib 10 (False)
  11. Rib 11 (Floating)
  12. Rib 12 (Floating)

 One only Bone:

  1.  Hyoid
  2. Sternum
  3. Cervical Vertebrae 1 (atlas)
  4. C2 (axis)
  5. C3
  6. C4
  7. C5
  8. C6
  9. C7
  10. Thoracic Vertebrae 1
  11. T2
  12. T3
  13. T4
  14. T5
  15. T6
  16. T7
  17. T8
  18. T9
  19. T10
  20. T11
  21. T12
  22. Lumbar Vertebrae 1
  23. L2
  24. L3
  25. L4
  26. L5
  27. Sacrum
  28. Coccyx

Now we will learn about Skull bones (28) one by one in detail.

Skull Bones (28):

The skull bones are a part of the axial skeleton. The axial skeleton is responsible for the support of the head and trunk. As we know skull has 28 bones which are discussed below with names. There are 11 paired bones which are as follows:-

Paired Bones (11 x 2 = 22):

1. Nasal Bone:

The nasal bone is a small, thin, and curved bone in the human skull. It is located in the middle of the face, and forms the bridge of the nose. The nasal bone helps to support the structure of the nose, and is one of the bones that is used to determine the age of a person from their skull.

2. Lacrimal Bone:

The lacrimal bone is a small, thin bone that is located in the upper part of the human eye socket. It is responsible for producing tears, which keep the eye moist and lubricated. The lacrimal bone is attached to the eyelid and the edge of the orbit (eye socket). The lacrimal bone is a very small and delicate bone, and is easily damaged. It can be fractured by a direct hit to the eye, or by a fall. A fracture of the lacrimal bone can cause severe pain, swelling, and blurred vision.

3. Inferior Bone:

There are three bones in the human body that are considered inferior: the clavicle, the fibula, and the tibia. The clavicle is the only bone in the human body that is not connected to another bone. It is located in the upper chest and connects the shoulder to the arm. The fibula and tibia are located in the lower leg. The fibula is on the outside of the leg, and the tibia is on the inside of the leg.

4. Nasal Concha Maxillary Bone:

The nasal concha maxillary bone is a small, curved, and spongy bone in the human body. It is located in the medial wall of the orbit, and is part of the orbitofrontal bone. The nasal concha maxillary bone helps to form the roof and lateral wall of the nasal cavity, and also helps to support the medial wall of the orbit.

5. Zygomatic Bone:

The zygomatic bone, also known as the cheekbone, is a bone located in the human skull. It is the bone that makes up the prominence of the cheeks. The zygomatic bone is responsible for facial expressions and is also involved in mastication (chewing).

6. Temporal Bone:

The temporal bone is a bone in the human skull. It is situated at the side of the head, beneath the parietal bone, and in front of the sphenoid bone. The temporal bone consists of a body, two squamous plates (the squamous temporal bone), two petrous pyramids, and four bones that form the ear (the malleus, incus, stapes, and tympanic part of the temporal bone).

7. Palatine Bone:

The palatine bone is a small, thin bone in the human body that is located in the roof of the mouth. It is one of the bones that make up the skull, and it is responsible for forming the hard palate. The palatine bone also helps to support the teeth and form the nasal cavity.

8. Parietal Bone:

The parietal bone is one of the two bones that make up the human skull. It is located at the top and back of the skull, and is responsible for protecting the brain. The parietal bone is also responsible for the formation of the roof of the mouth and part of the palate.

9. Malleus Bone:

The Malleus bone is one of the smallest bones in the human body. It is located in the middle ear, and is responsible for transmitting sound vibrations to the inner ear. The Malleus bone is attached to the tympanic membrane, which is the thin membrane that separates the outer and inner ears.

10. Incus Bone:

The incus is one of three tiny bones in the human ear that work together to transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the cochlea. The incus is the smallest and most medial of the three bones. It is also the only one that is not connected to another bone; it is attached to the malleus by a ligament.

11. Stapes Bone:

The stapes bone (also known as the stirrup bone) is one of the smallest bones in the human body. It is located in the middle ear, and helps to transmit sound vibrations from the eardrum to the inner ear. The stapes bone is attached to the oval window, which separates the middle ear and inner ear. The stapes bone is a very important part of the human auditory system. It plays a key role in hearing sounds, and helps to amplify sound vibrations. Damage to the stapes bone can result in hearing loss or impairment.

One only Bone:

1. Frontal bone:

The frontal bone is located in the human skull and is responsible for protecting the brain. It is the largest and most anterior bone in the skull. The frontal bone is also responsible for shaping the forehead and forming the roof of the eye sockets. The frontal bone is composed of two parts: the squamous part and the orbital part. The squamous part is thin and flat, while the orbital part is thicker and more curved. The two parts are connected by a suture.

2. Ethmoid bone: 

The ethmoid bone is a small, irregularly shaped bone located in the middle of the face between the eyes. It is one of the bones that make up the cranium, and it helps to protect the brain. The ethmoid bone is also responsible for housing the sinuses, which help to humidify and warm air as it passes through the nasal cavity.

3. Vomer bone:

The vomer (from Latin vomer, meaning “plowshare”) is a thin, flat, triangular bone in the nasal septum of the human skull. It separates the nasal cavity into two fossae. The vomer is attached to the premaxilla and maxilla bones in the front of the skull, and to the ethmoid and sphenoid bones at the rear.

4. Sphenoid bone:

The sphenoid bone is a unique and complex bone in the human body. It is one of the bones in the skull, and it has a variety of important functions. The sphenoid bone is responsible for housing the pituitary gland, and it also plays a role in facial development. This bone is also important for cranial nerve function. There are twelve cranial nerves, and the sphenoid bone houses six of them. These nerves control many important functions, such as vision, hearing, and speech.

5. Mandible bone:

The mandible is the lower jawbone in the human body. It is a curved bone that connects to the skull at the temporal bones and to the upper jaw at the maxilla. The mandible houses the teeth and supports the lips and cheeks. It also helps to form the floor of the mouth and plays a role in mastication, or chewing.

6. Occipital bone:

The occipital bone is a triangular-shaped bone located at the back of the head. It is the largest and heaviest bone in the human skull. The occipital bone protects the brain and spinal cord, and helps to hold the head upright. The occipital bone is divided into two parts: the body and the condyle. The body of the occipital bone is curved and sits on top of the spinal cord. The condyle is a knob-like projection that articulates with the first cervical vertebrae.

Awesome! I hope you have cleared all of your concepts through the article Learn all 206 bones in the body. If your answer is no then first read out again about skill bones so we proceed. It is important to clear previous concepts for further reading. Now, we will discuss about Torso Bones.

Torso Bones (52):

The torso is connected to the head and limbs, which are all connected to the spine. It is mentioned earlier that Torso has 52 bones. Before reading towards the Torso bones details, first we must have to discuss about Rib.

What is Rib?

The rib is a bone in the human body that is located on the left and right side of the thoracic cavity. It is the longest and most curved bone in the human body. The rib cage protects the heart, lungs, and other vital organs.

What is the rib cage?

The rib cage is a bony structure that surrounds the thoracic cavity and protects the lungs, heart, and other organs in the chest. The rib cage is composed of 12 pairs of ribs. The first seven pairs of ribs are attached to the sternum (breastbone) in the front of the body. The eighth, ninth, and tenth pairs of ribs are attached to the vertebrae in the back of the body. The eleventh and twelfth pairs of ribs are free-floating and not attached to any other bones.

Paired Bones (12 x 2 = 24):

1. Rib 1:

 The first rib is the most superior rib and is also the thinnest. It is located at the top of the ribcage, and is the first rib to articulate with the clavicle. The first rib is also the shortest rib, and is generally not visible in an X-ray.

 2. Rib 2

The 2nd rib is the second rib in the human body. It is located on the right side of the chest and is the first rib to articulate with the sternum. The 2nd rib is also responsible for articulating with the first thoracic vertebra.

 3. Rib 3

The 3rd rib is the most commonly fractured rib in the human body. It is located on the right side of the ribcage and is often injured in car accidents and from contact sports. The 3rd rib can be identified by its location, and by the fact that it is the only rib that has costal cartilage attached to it.

4. Rib 4

The fourth rib is located on the right side of the body, and is the fourth rib counting from the top. It is a short, curved bone that articulates with the fifth rib in the front and the seventh rib in the back. The fourth rib is one of the floating ribs, meaning that it is not attached to the sternum.

5. Rib 5

The 5th rib is located in the front of the human body, on the left side. It is the shortest and thinnest rib in the ribcage. The 5th rib attaches to the breastbone and the first thoracic vertebrae.

 6. Rib 6

The 6th rib is located in the human body between the 5th and 7th ribs. It is a small, triangular bone that is attached to the spine and helps to protect the lungs and heart. The 6th rib is not used for any specific purpose, but it can be helpful in identifying certain medical conditions. If you are experiencing pain in the area of the 6th rib, you should consult a doctor to determine the cause. Pain in this area can be a sign of a number of different medical conditions, including lung cancer, heart disease, and pneumonia.

7. Rib 7

 The 7th rib is located on the right side of the body and is the last rib in the thoracic region. It is a short, thin rib that does not have a lot of muscle attached to it. The 7th rib has a few important functions, including protecting the organs in the chest cavity and helping with breathing. The 7th rib is also known as the floating rib because it is not attached to any other bones in the body. This makes it more susceptible to injury than other ribs. If the 7th rib is injured, it can cause pain and difficulty breathing.

 8. Rib 8 (False)

The 8th rib is a false rib. It is not one of the true ribs, which are the first seven pairs of ribs that attach to the sternum in the front of the chest. The false ribs are the next five pairs of ribs, and the 8th rib is the last one in this group.

 9. Rib 9 (False)

The 9th rib is a false rib. It is not one of the 12 ribs that make up the thoracic cage. The 9th rib is an anomaly, and is found in less than 1% of the population.

10. Rib 10 (False)

The 10th rib is a false rib. It’s not really a rib at all, but rather the last part of the spine. It’s called the “false” rib because it’s not one of the true ribs that attach to the sternum. The 10th rib is actually a continuation of the vertebrae in the spine.

11. Rib 11 (Floating)

The eleventh rib (floating rib) is the last true rib and the shortest rib. It is so named because it is not attached to the sternum like the other ribs. The floating rib is found on the right side of the body and is attached to the vertebrae.

12. Rib 12 (Floating)

The 12th rib (floating rib) is the last rib in the human body. It is not attached to the sternum or the spine, and therefore moves independently. The 12th rib is found on the right side of the body, and is shorter and thinner than the other ribs. The 12th rib has no known function and is often removed during surgery. Some people believe that the 12th rib is responsible for extra-sensory perception or psychic ability, but there is no scientific evidence to support this claim.

One only Bone:

1. Hyoid

The hyoid bone is a horseshoe-shaped bone located in the neck, just below the chin. It is the only bone in the human body that doesn’t connect to any other bones. The hyoid bone plays an important role in the human body, as it helps to anchor the tongue and supports the muscles of the throat.

2. Sternum

The sternum is a long, flat bone in the center of the chest. It is one of the bones that make up the rib cage. The sternum is shaped like a T. It has a wide top, called the manubrium, and two pointed ends, called the xiphoid process. The sternum is attached to the ribs on either side. It helps to protect the heart and lungs. The sternum also helps to move the arms and hands.

3. Cervical Vertebrae 1 (atlas)

The atlas bone is the first cervical vertebrae in the human body. It is named for the Greek god Atlas, who was condemned to hold the world on his shoulders. The atlas bone is a small, cylindrical bone that is located in the neck. It is responsible for supporting the weight of the head. The atlas bone is attached to the skull by ligaments and muscles. It also connects to the second cervical vertebrae (the axis) and the rest of the spine. The atlas bone plays an important role in movement and posture.

4. C2 (axis)

The C2 (axis) bone is a small, delicate bone located in the human neck. It is one of the seven cervical vertebrae and helps to support the head and neck. The C2 is also responsible for articulating with the first thoracic vertebrae, and helps to initiate movement in the upper body.

5. C3

The C3 bone is one of the eight bones in the human body that make up the skull. It is located at the base of the skull, and its primary function is to protect the brain. The C3 bone is also responsible for housing the pituitary gland, which controls many important bodily functions such as growth, reproduction, and water balance.

6. C4

The C4 bone is located in the human body in the cervical vertebrae, which is the uppermost portion of the spine. The C4 bone helps to protect the spinal cord and support the head. The C4 bone is also responsible for moving the head from side to side.

7. C5

The C5 bone is located in the human cervical spine, which is the part of the spine that runs from the base of the skull to the chest. The C5 vertebra is the fifth vertebra in the cervical spine, and it is responsible for supporting the head and protecting the spinal cord. The C5 bone is also responsible for enabling movement of the neck.

8. C6

The C6 vertebra is located in the cervical spine, which is the upper part of the spine in the human body. The cervical spine contains seven vertebrae, which are designated C1 through C7. C6 is the sixth cervical vertebra. The C6 vertebra is responsible for supporting the head and neck. It also helps to protect the spinal cord. The spinal cord sends messages from the brain to the rest of the body.

9. C7

The C7 bone is the seventh cervical vertebra in the human body. It is located in the neck, and is responsible for supporting the head and neck. The C7 is also responsible for articulating with the sixth cervical vertebra, and the first thoracic vertebra.

10. Thoracic Vertebrae 1

The thoracic vertebrae are the twelve bones in the human spinal column that make up the chest region. They are situated between the cervical vertebrae and the lumbar vertebrae and are responsible for protecting the spinal cord and supporting the ribcage.

11. T2

The T2 bone is the second largest bone in the human body. It is located in the lower leg, and is responsible for supporting the weight of the body. The T2 bone is particularly important for athletes, as it helps them to run and jump effectively.

12. T3

The T3 bone is located in the human body in the upper arm, between the shoulder and the elbow. It is one of the longest bones in the arm, and helps to stabilize the shoulder and elbow joints. The T3 bone is also responsible for moving the arm in different directions.

13. T4

The T4 bone is a large, flat bone that lies at the front of the neck. It is roughly triangular, with broad surfaces on the front and back and a thin edge on the side. The bone is divided into two parts: the body and the spinous process.

14. T5

The fifth thoracic vertebra, or T5, is located in the middle of the thoracic spine, between the fourth and sixth thoracic vertebrae. It is a small, cylindrical vertebra that is slightly larger than the other thoracic vertebrae. The body of the T5 is about twice as long as it is wide. The T5 supports the weight of the head and upper body, and helps to protect the spinal cord. It also helps to move the arms and legs.

15. T6

To understand the T6 bone, it is important to have a basic understanding of the thoracic spine. The thoracic spine is made up of the 12 vertebrae in the middle of your back. These vertebrae are responsible for protecting your spinal cord and supporting your chest. The T6 vertebra is located in the middle of the thoracic spine. It is responsible for connecting your spine to your ribcage and for allowing you to move your spine in all directions. The T6 vertebra is also responsible for protecting your spinal cord.

16. T7

 The seventh cervical vertebra, or T7, is located in the human body at the level of the thoracic vertebrae. It is a small, cylindrical bone that is part of the cervical spine. The T7 supports the head and neck, and its role is to protect the spinal cord. The T7 is the smallest bone in the cervical spine, and it has a relatively simple structure.

17. T8

The T8 bone is a small, cylindrical bone in the thoracic region of the human skeleton. It is one of the 12 thoracic vertebrae and has two articulations: the first with the T7 vertebra and the second with the rib.

18. T9

The T9 bone is located in the thoracic region of the spine, and it is the ninth thoracic vertebra. The T9 bone is responsible for supporting the weight of the upper body. It also helps to protect the spinal cord.

19. T10

The T10 bone is located in the human body between the thoracic vertebrae and the lumbar vertebrae. It is a short, thick bone that helps to protect the spinal cord. The T10 bone is also responsible for helping to move the trunk of the body.

20. T11

The T11 bone is located in the human body between the ribcage and the pelvis. It is responsible for protecting the vital organs in the lower abdomen, including the kidneys and bladder. The T11 bone is also one of the weakest bones in the human body, making it susceptible to fracture in the event of a fall or other accident.

21. T12

The human body is a complex and amazing machine that can do incredible things. Each and every bone in our body serves an important purpose. The T12 bone, located in the thoracic region of the spine, is no exception. This bone is responsible for protecting the spinal cord and supporting the ribcage. The T12 bone is one of the largest and strongest bones in the human body. It is made up of dense connective tissue and is responsible for bearing a significant amount of weight. The T12 bone is also highly sensitive to pain, making it an important part of our defense system.

22. Lumbar Vertebrae 1

The lumbar vertebrae are the largest and strongest in the human body. They are located in the lower back, and are responsible for supporting most of the body’s weight. There are five lumbar vertebrae in total, and each one is responsible for a different movement.

23. L2

The L2 bone is one of the most important bones in the human body. It is located in the lower back, and helps to support the spine and other muscles in that area. The L2 bone is also responsible for protecting the spinal cord from damage.

24. L3

The lumbar spine, or the L3 bone, is a vertebra in the human body. It is located in the lower back, and is one of the five lumbar vertebrae in the spinal column. The L3 bone is responsible for supporting the weight of the upper body, and for connecting the torso to the legs. It also houses the spinal cord, which carries nerve impulses between the brain and the rest of the body.

25. L4

The L4 bone is located in the lumbar region of the human spine. It is one of the five lumbar vertebrae, and helps to support the weight of the upper body. The L4 is the fourth vertebra from the bottom, and is situated just below the ribcage.

26. L5

The L5 bone is located in the lower back, and is one of the five lumbar vertebrae in the human body. It is responsible for supporting the upper body, and helps to protect the spinal cord. The L5 bone is also involved in movement and flexibility, and can be injured if too much stress is placed on it.

27. Sacrum

The sacrum is a triangular bone at the base of the spine that is formed by the fusion of five vertebrae. The sacrum is important because it supports the weight of the upper body and provides a base for the pelvic muscles. The spinal cord is a very important part of the body. It houses and protects the spinal cord.

28. Coccyx

The coccyx is a small, triangular bone at the base of the spine. It is made up of four or five small vertebrae, and is sometimes called the tailbone. The coccyx is attached to the sacrum, which is located at the base of the spine, and helps to support the weight of the upper body.

WoW! You also have finalized the deep detail about Torso. I hope that the article Learn all 206 bones in the body would not bother you.  Now Axial Skeleton containing 80 bones is finalized. Now we will lead towards appendicular skeleton which has 126 bones. If you don’t have cleared all of your doubts about Axial Skeleton then read out it again, because the article Learn all 206 bones in the body has done much hard work for you. Let us lead towards appendicular Skeleton.

Appendicular Skeleton:

The appendicular skeleton is the collection of bones in the limbs of the body. It includes the bones of the arms and legs, as well as the pectoral and pelvic girdles. The appendicular skeleton attaches to the axial skeleton, which includes the bones of the head, neck, and trunk. The appendicular skeleton is important for movement. The arms and legs are able to move because they are attached to the pectoral and pelvic girdles. The pectoral girdle attaches to the thoracic cage, and the pelvic girdle attaches to the spine.

There are 126 bones in the appendicular skeleton. This includes the bones of the arms and legs, as well as the pectoral and pelvic girdles. There are 32 pairs of bones in Upper extremity and 31 pairs of bones in lower extremity. The names of them are discussed as follows:-

Upper Extremity (32 x 2 = 64):

  1. Scapula
  2. Clavicle
  3. Humerus
  4. Radius
  5. Ulna
  6. Scaphoid
  7. Lunate
  8. Triquetrum
  9. Pisiform
  10. Hamate
  11. Capitate
  12. Trapezoid
  13. Trapezium
  14. Metacarpal 1
  15. Proximal Phalange 1
  16. Distal Phalange 1
  17. Metacarpal 2
  18. Proximal Phalange 2
  19. Middle Phalange 2
  20. Distal Phalange 2
  21. Metacarpal 3
  22. Proximal Phalange 3
  23. Middle Phalange 3
  24. Distal Phalange 3
  25. Metacarpal 4
  26. Proximal Phalange 4
  27. Middle Phalange 4
  28. Distal Phalange 4
  29. Metacarpal 5
  30. Proximal Phalange 5
  31. Middle Phalange 5
  32. Distal Phalange 5

Lower Extremity (31 x 2 = 62):

  1. Hip (Ilium, Ischium, Pubis)
  2. Femur
  3. Patella
  4. Tibia
  5. Fibula
  6. Talus
  7. Calcaneus
  8. Navicular
  9. Medial Cuneiform
  10. Middle Cuneiform
  11. Lateral Cuneiform
  12. Cuboid
  13. Metatarsal 1
  14. Proximal Phalange 1
  15. Distal Phalange 1
  16. Metatarsal 2
  17. Proximal Phalange 2
  18. Middle Phalange 2
  19. Distal Phalange 2
  20. Metatarsal 3
  21. Proximal Phalange 3
  22. Middle Phalange 3
  23. Distal Phalange 3
  24. Metatarsal 4
  25. Proximal Phalange 4
  26. Middle Phalange 4
  27. Distal Phalange 4
  28. Metatarsal 5
  29. Proximal Phalange 5
  30. Middle Phalange 5
  31. Distal Phalange 5

Now we’ll see the 126 bones of appendicular skeleton one by one in detail. First of all we’ll learn about the bones of Upper extremity of the appendicular skeleton.

Appendicular Skeleton (126)

Upper Extremity of Appendicular Skeleton in the human body:  

The upper extremity is the part of the human body that includes the shoulder, arm, and hand. The upper extremity is responsible for performing many tasks, including grasping, lifting, and throwing. The shoulder is a ball-and-socket joint that allows a wide range of motion in the arm. The arm is made up of three bones: the humerus, the radius, and the ulna. The hand has five metacarpal bones and fourteen phalanges.

Upper Extremity (32 x 2 = 64):

1. Scapula

The scapula bone is one of the most distinctive bones in the human body. It is located in the upper extremity, and plays a vital role in the movement of the arm. The scapula is triangular in shape, and has a ridge along its length called the spine. The spine divides the scapula into two sections: the medial border and the lateral border. The medial border is shorter and curved, while the lateral border is longer and straight. The surface of the scapula is covered with muscle tissue, which helps to move the arm.

 2. Clavicle

The clavicle is a long, slender bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It is also known as the collarbone. The clavicle is one of the more commonly fractured bones in the body. It is located between the shoulder blade and the breastbone.

 3. Humerus

The Humerus bone is the longest and largest bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It extends from the shoulder to the elbow, and has several functions including supporting the arm, providing attachments for muscles, and forming part of the joint that connects the arm to the shoulder blade.

4. Radius

The radius bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is one of two bones in the forearm, the other being the ulna. The radius is located on the thumb side of the forearm, and is responsible for moving the hand and fingers.

 5. Ulna

The ulna bone is a long bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It is one of two bones in the forearm, the other being the radius bone. The ulna is situated on the medial side of the forearm. It starts just below the shoulder and ends just below the wrist.

6. Scaphoid

The scaphoid bone is a small, curved bone in the wrist that helps to stabilize the hand. It is located on the thumb side of the wrist, and is one of the eight bones that make up the wrist joint. The scaphoid bone is prone to injury, as it is located near the base of the thumb where a lot of force is exerted during activities such as gripping, twisting, and pushing.

7. Lunate

The lunate bone is one of eight small bones in the human wrist. It is wedge-shaped and sits between the radius and the carpals. The lunate helps to stabilize the wrist and allows for a wide range of motion.

8. Triquetrum

The triquetrum is a bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It is located on the medial side of the forearm, between the hamate and the lunate. The triquetrum is a small, triangular bone that articulates with the ulna and the pisiform.

9. Pisiform

The pisiform bone is a small, triangular bone that is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is situated on the medial side of the forearm, between the ulna and the hamate bones. The pisiform bone is one of the carpal bones, which are the eight small bones that make up the wrist.

10. Hamate

The hamate bone is a small, irregularly-shaped bone in the hand. It’s located on the little finger side of the hand, in the space between the hand and the wrist. The hamate bone has a number of important functions. It helps to form the carpometacarpal joint, which is the joint that connects the hand to the forearm. It also provides stability to the little finger, and helps to transmit forces from the hand to the forearm.

11. Capitate

The capitate bone is one of eight carpal bones in the human hand. It is a short, thick bone located at the base of the thumb. The capitate bone forms the proximal part of the carpometacarpal joint, which is the main joint of the thumb. The capitate bone is supplied with blood by two arteries: the radial artery and the ulnar artery. The radial artery supplies blood to the lateral side of the bone, and the ulnar artery supplies blood to the medial side of the bone. The capitate bone also receives lymphatic drainage from the hand.

12. Trapezoid

The trapezoid bone is a small, four-sided bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It is located in the posterior region of the shoulder, and helps to form the shoulder joint. The trapezoid bone is also responsible for attaching the deltoid and rotator cuff muscles to the shoulder blade.

13. Trapezium

The trapezium bone is one of the small bones in the human body’s upper extremity. It is triangular in shape, and is located at the thumb side of the wrist. The trapezium helps to stabilize the wrist joint, and also assists in the movement of the thumb.

14. Metacarpal 1

The metacarpal 1 bone is one of the five long bones in the human body that make up the hand. It is located in the palm and is responsible for connecting the hand to the forearm. The metacarpal 1 bone is also responsible for forming the knuckles on the hand.

15. Proximal Phalange 1

The proximal phalange 1 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is one of the small bones that make up the hand and is responsible for movement of the fingers. The proximal phalange 1 is also known as the index finger bone.

16. Distal Phalange 1

The distal phalange 1 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body and is responsible for grasping and fine manipulation. It is a small, thin bone that sits at the end of the fingers and is connected to the metacarpals. The distal phalange 1 bone is also responsible for forming the knuckle joint.

17. Metacarpal 2

The metacarpal 2 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is responsible for connecting the fingers to the hand, and helps to provide stability and mobility to the hand. The metacarpal 2 bone is also one of the most commonly fractured bones in the hand.

18. Proximal Phalange 2

The proximal phalange 2 is the bone in the upper extremity of the human body that connects to the metacarpals. It is also responsible for articulating with the proximal phalanges of the fingers. The proximal phalange 2 is a small, thin bone that is easily injured.

19. Middle Phalange 2

The middle phalange 2 is the bone in the upper extremity of the human body that is located between the index finger and the ring finger. It is also referred to as the “medial phalanx” or “third phalanx”. The middle phalange 2 is a small, cylindrical bone that is composed of cancellous and cortical bone. The proximal end of the middle phalange articulates with the metacarpal bone of the hand, and the distal end articulates with the proximal phalanx of the finger.

20. Distal Phalange 2

The distal phalange 2 is a bone in the Upper Extremity of the human body. It is located between the middle and proximal phalanges and is responsible for the movement of the fingers.

21. Metacarpal 3

The metacarpal 3 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the third bone in the row of five metacarpal bones in the hand. The metacarpal 3 bone is responsible for connecting the hand to the forearm, and it helps to form the knuckles in the hand.

22. Proximal Phalange 3

The proximal phalange 3 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the longest and largest of the phalanges, and is responsible for the movement of the fingers. The proximal phalange 3 bone is attached to the metacarpal bones of the hand, and articulates with the distal and middle phalanges.

23. Middle Phalange 3

The middle phalange 3 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the longest and largest of the phalanges and is responsible for extension of the digits. The middle phalange 3 bone is made up of cancellous and cortical bone, and is connected to the proximal phalange 2 and distal phalange 1 bones by the joint capsule.

24. Distal Phalange 3

The distal phalange 3 is the bone in the upper extremity of the human body that is located between the metacarpal bones and the proximal phalanges. It is a small, cylindrical bone that articulates with the metacarpals at one end and with the proximal phalanges on the other. The distal phalange 3 is responsible for flexing and extending the fingers.

25. Metacarpal 4

The metacarpal 4 bone is one of the five long bones in the human body that make up the hand. It is located in the palm of the hand, and is responsible for connecting the fingers to the hand. The metacarpal 4 bone is responsible for both movement and support in the hand.

26. Proximal Phalange 4

The proximal phalange 4 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is a small, thin bone that is responsible for connecting the hand to the forearm. The proximal phalange 4 bone is also responsible for articulating with the metacarpal bones, which are located in the hand.

27. Middle Phalange 4

The middle phalange 4 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is located between the index finger bone and the ring finger bone. The middle phalange 4 bone is responsible for movement of the fingers and hand.

28. Distal Phalange 4

The distal phalange 4 is a bone in the upper extremity of the human body. It is located between the middle and proximal phalanges, and is the smallest bone in the hand. The distal phalange 4 is responsible for movement of the fingers, and has a limited range of motion.

29. Metacarpal 5

The metacarpal 5 bone is the fifth bone in the metacarpus, which is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is a short, cylindrical bone that connects to the proximal phalanx of the little finger. The metacarpal 5 bone is also responsible for articulating with the metacarpal 4 bone.

30. Proximal Phalange 5

The proximal phalange 5 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the bone that connects the hand to the arm, and it is responsible for the movement of the fingers. The proximal phalange 5 bone is made up of three parts: the base, the shaft, and the head. The base is the widest part of the bone, and it connects to the hand. The shaft is thin and runs along the length of the bone. The head is at the top of the bone and it attaches to the metacarpal bones.

31. Middle Phalange 5

The middle phalange 5 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the longest and thinnest bone in the hand. The middle phalange 5 bone helps to form the knuckle on the hand and is responsible for movement of the fingers.

32. Distal Phalange 5

The distal phalange 5 bone is located in the upper extremity of the human body. It is the bone that makes up the fingertip. The distal phalange 5 bone is a small, curved bone that sits at the end of the finger. It is responsible for movement and sensation in the fingertip.

Have you really reached here? That’s awesome! You have completed information about almost 144 bones through this article Learn all 206 bones in the body.  Now we lead towards the lower extremity of the Appendicular Skeleton and discuss in detail about it one by one.

Lower Extremity of Appendicular Skeleton in the human body:

The lower extremity is a complex system of muscles, bones, and joints that allow us to move around. It starts with the hip, which is the largest and strongest bone in the body. The femur attaches to the hip and runs down the thigh. The knee is a hinge joint that connects the femur and tibia, and allows for movement in the front to back and side to side planes. The ankle is a hinge joint that connects the tibia and fibula, and allows for movement in the up and down plane.

Lower Extremity (31 x 2 = 62):

1. Hip (Ilium, Ischium, Pubis)

The Hip (Ilium, Ischium, Pubis) bone is located in the lower extremity of the human body. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The femur (thighbone) is the ball and the acetabulum (a socket in the pelvis) is the socket. The joint is not just a simple connection between two bones but is held together by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The hip joint is a weight-bearing joint. It helps us walk, run, and jump.

2. Femur

The femur is the longest and strongest bone in the human body. It is the uppermost bone in the leg, and attaches to the hip bone in the pelvis. The femur is responsible for bearing the weight of the body and transferring that weight to the ground. The femur is a multipurpose bone. It is responsible for both movement and stability. The femur has a large range of motion, which allows us to walk, run, and jump. The femur also provides stability for the knee joint.

3. Patella

The patella, also known as the kneecap, is a small bone in the lower extremity of the human body. It is located in front of the femur and articulates with the tibia. The patella helps to protect the knee joint and provides leverage for muscle contraction.

4. Tibia

The tibia is the larger and stronger of the two bones of the lower leg, the other being the fibula. It extends from just below the knee to the ankle. The tibia is a weight-bearing bone and plays an important role in both standing and walking.

5. Fibula

The fibula is a long, thin bone in the lower leg. It is situated between the tibia, which is the larger and stronger bone in the lower leg, and the ankle bones. The fibula has two main functions: it supports the weight of the body and helps to form the ankle joint. It also plays a role in movement of the foot and ankle.

6. Talus

The talus is one of the tarsal bones of the foot. It is a small, irregularly shaped bone that articulates with the navicular bone, calcaneus, and first metatarsal bone. The talus lies just in front of the ankle and helps to form the ankle joint.

7. Calcaneus

The calcaneus is a bone in the lower extremity of the human body. It is situated at the back of the foot, below the ankle. The calcaneus is the largest bone in the foot and is responsible for weight-bearing. It articulates with the talus, which in turn articulates with the tibia and fibula.

8. Navicular

The navicular bone is a small, triangular bone in the foot that is located between the heel bone (calcaneus) and two other small bones called the cuboid and the cuneiforms. It is positioned on the medial (inner) side of the foot. The navicular bone has a number of important functions, including:

  • Supporting the arch of the foot
  • Acting as a shock absorber
  • Helping to stabilize the ankle joint

9. Medial Cuneiform

The medial cuneiform is one of the bones in the foot. It is located in the middle of the foot, and is responsible for supporting the arch of the foot. The medial cuneiform is also responsible for attaching the muscles in the foot to the toes.

10. Middle Cuneiform

Middle cuneiform is one of the three cuneiform bones in the human foot. It is located between the first and second metatarsal bones, and is responsible for the toes’ abduction and adduction. Middle cuneiform also helps to maintain the arch of the foot.

11. Lateral Cuneiform

The lateral cuneiform is a small bone in the foot that connects to four other bones: the first metatarsal, the second metatarsal, the navicular, and the cuboid. It is located on the lateral side of the foot, and is triangular in shape. The lateral cuneiform helps to support the arch of the foot, and also assists in foot movement.

12. Cuboid

The cuboid is a small bone in the foot that connects the heel to the two long bones in the front of the foot. It helps to support the arch of the foot and play a role in the movement of the ankle and toes. The cuboid is one of the less commonly injured bones in the foot, but when it is injured, it can be very painful.

13. Metatarsal 1

The metatarsal 1 is the long bone in the foot that connects the ankle to the toes. It is located on the medial side of the foot, and is responsible for supporting the arch of the foot. The metatarsal 1 is also responsible for transmitting weight from the heel to the toes.

14. Proximal Phalange 1

The proximal phalange 1 is the first bone in the lower extremity of the human body. It is also known as the big toe bone. The proximal phalange 1 is a small, thin bone that is located at the base of the big toe. It helps to stabilize the toe and allows it to move up and down.

15. Distal Phalange 1

The distal phalange 1 is a small bone in the human foot that connects to the metatarsals. It is located at the end of the foot, and is responsible for movement of the toes. The distal phalange 1 is also responsible for the arch of the foot. The distal phalange 1 is susceptible to injuries, such as fractures, due to its location at the end of the foot. Treatment for a fractured distal phalange 1 may include immobilization, surgery, or physical therapy.

16. Metatarsal 2

The metatarsal 2 is one of the five metatarsal bones in the human foot. It is located on the medial side of the foot, and is the second-most proximal (closest to the ankle) of the metatarsals. The metatarsal 2 articulates with the cuboid bone, and helps to form the arch of the foot.

17. Proximal Phalange 2

The proximal phalange 2 is the longest and strongest of the phalanges in the human foot. It is also the most weight-bearing, due to its location at the ball of the foot. The proximal phalange 2 articulates with the metatarsals, and helps to spread the force of weight-bearing across all five toes.

18. Middle Phalange 2

The middle phalange 2 is the second phalange in the lower extremity of the human body. It is located between the proximal and distal phalanges, and is responsible for articulating with the metatarsals. The middle phalange 2 is also responsible for the movement and stability of the toe.

19. Distal Phalange 2

The distal phalange 2 is the bone located at the tips of the fingers and toes. It is the smallest and most delicate bone in the human body. The distal phalange 2 is responsible for movement and dexterity in the fingers and toes.

20. Metatarsal 3

The metatarsal 3 is one of the five metatarsals in the human foot. It is located on the medial side of the foot, between the first and second metatarsals. It is the shortest and smallest of the metatarsals. The metatarsal 3 is responsible for supporting the arch of the foot, and helps to distribute weight evenly across the foot. It also helps to move the foot forward when walking or running.

21. Proximal Phalange 3

The proximal phalange 3 is located in the lower extremity of the human body. It is the longest and largest phalange, and is located between the metatarsal bones and the proximal phalanges 1 and 2. The proximal phalange 3 is responsible for movement of the toes, and is connected to the muscles in the lower leg by tendons.

22. Middle Phalange 3

The middle phalange 3 is found in the lower extremity of the human body. It is located between the proximal and distal phalanges, and is responsible for extension and flexion of the toes. The middle phalange 3 is also responsible for abduction and adduction of the toes.

23. Distal Phalange 3

The distal phalange 3 is the bone that is located at the end of the human foot. It is responsible for supporting the weight of the body and enabling movement. The distal phalange 3 is also known as the toe bone.

24. Metatarsal 4

The metatarsal 4 is a bone in the lower extremity of the human body. It is located in the foot, and is responsible for connecting the ankle to the toes. The metatarsal 4 is the longest bone in the foot, and is responsible for supporting a large amount of weight.

25. Proximal Phalange 4

The proximal phalange 4 is the fourth bone in the proximal row of the human foot. It is also known as the big toe bone. The proximal phalange 4 articulates with the metatarsal 1 at the metatarsophalangeal joint.

26. Middle Phalange 4

The middle phalange 4 is located in the lower extremity of the human body. It is the longest and thinnest of the three phalanges in the foot, and is responsible for extension and flexion of the toes. The middle phalange 4 is also involved in the propulsion of the foot during walking or running.

27. Distal Phalange 4

The distal phalange 4 is a bone in the lower extremity of the human body. It is located between the proximal phalange 3 and the metatarsal bones. The distal phalange 4 is responsible for weight bearing and helps to stabilize the foot.

28. Metatarsal 5

The metatarsal 5 is one of the long bones in the human foot. It is located in the middle of the foot, and is responsible for supporting the arch of the foot. The metatarsal 5 is also responsible for transferring weight from the heel to the toes.

29. Proximal Phalange 5

The proximal phalange 5 is located in the lower extremity of the human body. It is the bone that makes up the big toe. The proximal phalange 5 is responsible for the movement of the big toe, as well as providing stability and support.

30. Middle Phalange 5

The middle phalange 5 is the longest and has the most curvature of the three phalanges in the human foot. It is located between the proximal phalange and the distal phalange. The proximal phalange 5 is the bone closest to the big toe, while the distal phalange is the bone closest to the heel.

31. Distal Phalange 5

The distal phalange 5 is the smallest and most distal bone in the human foot. It is located between the first metatarsal bone and the proximal phalange of the little toe. The distal phalange 5 is a trapezoidal bone that is slightly curved. The distal phalange 5 is responsible for articulating with the proximal phalange of the little toe, and helps to stabilize the joint. It also assists in weight-bearing and provides leverage for the flexor muscles of the toes.

Congratulation! You have learned about all 206 bones in the body through this article. I hope all of your concepts and doubts are cleared after reading this article Learn all 206 bones in the body. Now we will discuss FAQ:

Frequently Asked Questions:

Ques: How can I remember the 206 bones?

There are 206 bones in the human body. Here’s how to remember them:

First of all you have to take out the print of the picture of Human Skeleton and draw it yourself. Take a start from the head and recall the article Learn all 206 bones in the body which have discussed earlier. After that lead towards eyes and then nose, tech, ears neck and so forth. Recall your memorization and read at least 02 or 03 topics daily and mark it on a picture of the skeleton which you have printed out for memorization. We have attempted our best tries in the article Learn all 206 bones in the body to memorize you about 206 bones.

We have tried to write this article in the best possible way that you will be learn about it and also able to teach others. After going the learning criteria which is discussed above, you will learn all 206 bones.

Ques: How can I remember my tibia and fibula?

Ans: There are three ways to remember the bones in your leg:

  • The tibia is the big one on the inside, and the fibula is the small one on the outside.
  • The tibia is the bone in your knee, and the fibula is the bone in your ankle.
  • The tibia is on the bottom, and the fibula is on top.

Ques: How long does it take to memorize anatomy?

Ans: There is no one definitive answer to this question. It may take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, or even longer, to memorize all of the anatomy of the human body. It depends on how much time you are willing to dedicate to the task, and how well you are able to focus and learn. Some people find that using mnemonic devices (associating new information with something familiar) helps them learn and remember anatomy more quickly and easily. Others prefer to use flashcards or diagrams to help them visualize the different parts of the body.

Ques: How long does it take to learn all the bones?

Ans: Short answer: It depends.

There are 206 bones in the human body, and each one can take a different amount of time to learn. You might be able to learn all the bones in your body within a few weeks, or it might take you a few months. It really depends on how much time and effort you put into it.

Ques: What is the smallest organ?

Ans: The smallest organ in the human body is the red blood cell. Red blood cells are about 7 micrometers in diameter and lack nuclei or other organelles.

Conclusion:

This article provides a list of all 206 bones in the human body. If you want to learn more about each individual bone, this is the article for you. By knowing where each and every bone is located, you can better understand the workings of your own body.

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